Diagnostic Procedures

 

Fluorescein Angiogram (FA) and Photography: This is an in-office procedure using a digital camera that is used for diagnostic purposes. Color and black-and-white photographs are taken of one or both eyes. The fluorescein angiogram portion of the photographs uses an injection of a vegetable-based dye into a vein, which is then followed by a series of pictures of your eye(s).

 

Indocyanine Green (ICG): This test is similar to the fluorescein angiogram and also involves injection of a dye into a vein, which is then followed by a series of pictures.

 

Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT): This is a noninvasive office photographic procedure that gives a cross-sectional image through the retina.

 

Ultrasound: This noninvasive test is performed to check on the status of the retina when the view through the pupil is limited. It is also performed to measure masses in the eye.

 

Electroretinogram (ERG)/Electrooculogram (EOG): These noninvasive procedures measure the electrical activity in the eye and are often used in the diagnosis and monitoring of patients with inherited retinal diseases, e.g. retinitis pigmentosa. They involve the placement of electrodes on the eye followed by various patterns of light stimuli.

 

Visual Field: This procedure allows evaluation of the peripheral vision and involves being exposed to small lights in various parts of your vision.

 

Preferential Hyperacuity Perimeter (PHP): This noninvasive screening test is a visual field test that focuses on the center of vision. The test is more sensitive than the Amsler grid in finding changes from macular degeneration and is performed up to every three months.

 

In-House Therapeutic Procedures

 

Sub-Tenon’s Injection: After completely anesthetizing the area, this type of injection is given alongside the eye. The eye itself is not penetrated. Usually a steroid is used for either edema (swelling) in the retina or to help control inflammation in the eye.

 

Intravitreal Injection: Intravitreal injections can be given for many reasons including for macular degeneration, edema of the retina, and infection in the eye. The eye is first anesthetized and sterilized, and then the injection follows.

 

Retinal Laser: There are many retinal diseases for which laser procedures are performed. These include, but are not limited to, retinal tears, retinal edema, and abnormal growth of blood vessels from diabetes and macular degeneration.

 

In-Hospital Procedures

 

Vitrectomy: This procedure is currently the most common in hospital procedure for retinal diseases. The procedure involves removing the vitreous gel in the eye using special instruments. Sometimes a bubble of air or gas is left in the eye that can last a few weeks. Some of the more common reasons a vitrectomy is performed include macular pucker, macular hole, retinal detachment, and vitreous hemorrhage. The procedure is most often performed under local anesthesia and is generally a same-day, outpatient surgery.

 

Scleral Buckle: A scleral buckle is a type of belt that is placed around the eye to aid in the repair of a retinal detachment. The placement of a scleral buckle is sometimes accompanied by a vitrectomy. The procedure is most often performed under local anesthesia and is generally a same-day, outpatient surgery.